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Monday, August 15, 2022

Why People Don't Trust The FBI

 By Warren.

As most of you know, I live in Indiana. Several years ago, in Indiana, if you had a license to carry a concealed weapon, you could walk into a gun store and buy a pistol or long gun only having to fill out the required Federal form -- ATF Form 4473 -- and you could walk out with the firearm.

This was normal, and you had already gone through the local police, been fingerprinted, gone through a background check, submitted 3 personal recommendations attesting to character, a State police check, and an FBI background check. At that time, an FBI check meant that they would have to search written records -- if you had a file/record. The process would take -- at the very least --  a month. In my case it took longer.

The reason for that delay?  I had an FBI record, so someone would have to physically find the record and see what was in it. The reason I had a record?  I had a secret security clearance, and my entire life had been researched by the FBI before the clearance was granted. 

Several years later, the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) was instituted, and I bought a .22 caliber rifle at a gun show. Even though I had a license to carry a concealed weapon, the sale was put on hold for 3 days before I could acquire the rifle. The rule was the FBI had to respond within 3 days or the purchase could go through.

Things in Indiana are different now. I no longer even need a license to carry concealed -- although I have one. Getting a license was the reason I started to become curious about the FBI.

Later on, there were Ruby Ridge, the Branch Davidians, the ruination of Richard Jewell, Clivan Bundy, Dr Steven J Hatill and several other incidents that pointed out the shabbiness and extralegal operations of the FBI.  All that shabbiness and the various extralegal operations of the FBI are why I don't trust the FBI -- or, for that matter, any other agency of the Government.

I came across a series of articles from The Capital Research Center, an investigative think tank that was "established in 1984 to examine how foundations, charities, and other nonprofits spend money and get involved in politics and advocacy, often in ways that donors never intended and would find abhorrent." 

See a culmination of several articles with links to other articles related to the FBI.

Read it or remain ignorant.  

Your choice.

Warren

98 comments:

  1. The FBI, like many of the alphabets, is largely unaccountable. One point in their defense: At least they tried to hold the liar McCabe accountable, but Biden's JustUs Department did Andy a large, and now he pontificates on CNN.

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  2. There is corruption and malfeasance in every government agency, from federal to local...so this isn't a surprise to anyone who's paid attention. I'd argue that on average, you'd find more corruption in local law enforcement than federal.

    But having an easily targetable, central boogeyman is the natural 'enemy'. Hell, the rubes even invented an umbrella boogeyman to launch their rage at, justified or not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True enough. Here in my county a formerly very respected sheriff was found to have been a serial abuser, corrupt, and advanced the careers of women who *ahem * fulfilled his wishes.

      It all came out, he was prosecuted, and the sheriff's department got a thorough house cleaning.

      Related to this, with the proliferation of everyone carrying a camera in their pocket, our eyes have been open to what minority and poor communities have been telling us for decades: there are corrupt police officers, and in cases like New Orleans if anyone remembers, entire corrupt police departments.

      So we see corruption at the local level, but then we also see prosecutions and house cleanings because the evil doings were exposed.

      The days of the local corrupt official or rich person running everything and stifling everything are over.

      We never see such exposures and house cleaning in any federal agency.

      Delete
  3. Read your thoughts, Warren and the link is a great one! My view is jaundiced because of one event: the Garland attack at the Geller event. I was there as a member of the press corps along with Fox News, etc. To later find out that an F.B.I. agent had told the men to "Tear up Texas" and was busy filming the whole thing disgusted me on a very deep level. One individual was shot - but by friendly fire. What if the beautiful, young red-headed girl had been killed in the melee?
    For the record: I also harbor concern that the agency is used as a domestic political weapon. Remind me of the date of the raid on the Clinton manse, and I might change my mind.

    https://thelastenglishprince.wordpress.com/2022/08/07/f-b-i-corruption-beyond-the-ezekiel-protocol/

    Tammy Swofford

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. And the recent IRS plus up gives more firepower to One of the governments domestic political weapons.

      The threat of ruination by IRS is second only perhaps to ruination by threat of federal prosecution.

      Harvey silverglate, three felonies per day. As in we all commit at least three felonies every day.

      Behave yourself, and the system will let it slide. Step out of line and they've got you.

      Delete
    2. @ Tammy, Warren here.
      Here is a quick link to Tammy's post. It's definitely worth a read!

      Delete
    3. The Ezekiel Protocol? What is that? In years of study in philosophy and theology, I've never seen anything like that before. Using Google was also no help as to what it is.

      Where did this come from? When was it first cited? What theologians have also called the passage cited the "Ezekiel Protocol"?

      Delete
    4. Dave,

      You sound excited. What if it came from Tammy's own brain?

      Would that make it any less legitimate.

      People put tags on things all the time. Anti-Trumpers, including those in the press, declaring themselves "The Resistance" was a little overblow dont'cha think? Not to include disrespectful of real people who sacrificed everything to fight an actual resistance.

      Delete
    5. Perhaps if Dave had actually read the post instead of criticizing it's title, he would know where it came from. He wouldn't have to have read more than the first paragraph.

      She was there, she reported on it and she can title it anything she wishes irregardless of the opinions of hack preachers who think they have the 'inside track'.
      Tammy is a journalist in her own right.

      Delete
  4. For quite a while now, we have been in an era of rule of power. A cynic would say, well, it's always been rule of power, our government just dressed it up as rule of law.

    Our federal government wields awesome and fearsome power, and both parties have become more willing over the past decades to brutally employ it. That is why elections are so hotly contested

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A cynic or astute observer.

      Our federal government has stepped so far outside of it's mandated scope, that there's no turning back. We need to kill it with fire and begin anew.

      Delete
    2. Cynic. The astute observer is the Kynic.

      from The New Yorker...

      In 1983, a few years after his return, Sloterdijk published a thousand-page book that has sold more copies than any other postwar book of German philosophy. The title, “The Critique of Cynical Reason,” seemed to promise a cheeky update of Kant’s “Critique of Pure Reason,” but the book instead delivered a wildly personal polemic about the deterioration of the utopian spirit of 1968 and called for Sloterdijk’s generation to take stock of itself. His peers, as they reached middle age, were pragmatically adjusting to global capitalism and to the nuclear stalemate of the Cold War. He issued a challenge to readers to scour history and art for ways of overcoming social atomization. Punning on Kant’s concept of the thing-in-itself, he asked, “Have we not become the isolated thing-for-yourself in the middle of similar beings?”

      The antidote to cynicism, he suggested, was a re-immersion in the heritage of the Cynics of ancient Greece. He looked to the philosopher Diogenes, who rejected the social conventions that governed human behavior and said that people should live instinctively, like dogs. The word “cynic” comes from the Greek kynikos, meaning “doglike,” and Sloterdijk coined the term “kynicism” to differentiate Diogenes’ active assault on prevailing norms from the passive disengagement of the late twentieth century. He celebrated the direct way that Diogenes made his points—masturbating in the marketplace, defecating in the theatre—and suggested that the answer to his generation’s malaise was to repurpose the spontaneous currents of sixties counterculture.

      The book caught a moment and made philosophy seem both relevant and fun, beguiling readers with arguments about the philosophical import of breasts and farts. But although it made Sloterdijk’s name, he remained an academic outsider, drifting from post to post for almost a decade. His response was to dismiss those who dismissed him—“Their codes and rituals are reliably antithetical to thought,” he told me—and to forge his reputation instead with articles in magazines and newspapers. He received job offers from America, but it was becoming clear that he was by nature a gadfly—that he and Germany needed each other because they agitated each other so much.

      Delete
    3. The cynic is its' owner's "dog" who "justifies' the prevailing social order.

      Delete
    4. Cynics develop the 1st order "University Discourse" to explain the "arbitrary" power and Super-Ego-centric decisions resulting from "Master's Discourse" to the "rest of us peons".

      Delete
    5. For the Master is a democracy is "the voter"...

      Delete
    6. ...and the "myth" of a free and fair election sustains the "presidential office holder's" authority and power.

      Delete
    7. ((!Thought Criminal)))August 15, 2022 at 7:53:00 AM CDT

      This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    8. (((Thought Criminal)))August 15, 2022 at 7:57:00 AM CDT

      This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    9. ...with beamish around, Joe Biden's balls will only get dusty, explaining the need to keep frequently washing them in beamish's whisky glass.

      Delete
    10. TC, Don't know what you were whining about. I didn't delete anything.

      Delete
    11. @SF - Agreed. It has to start with an audit. Good luck though, in finding an independent, objective and unbeholden entity to carry out such a task.

      Delete
    12. I would love to see a candidate and party run on reforming government. Put the social stuff aside, and let's reform government.

      It can't be some egomaniac screaming drain the swamp. We've seen that picture, and it didn't turn out well.

      The swamp drainers need to be insiders, who want to see our institutions reformed.

      Our federal government could probably take a 20% cut without missing a beat.

      It needs a 50% cut




      Delete
    13. (((Thought Criminal)))August 15, 2022 at 8:37:00 AM CDT

      This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    14. Three wise men of Gotham,
      They went to sea in a bowl,
      And if the bowl had been stronger
      My song would have been longer

      Delete
    15. @ SF,
      I deleted his comments just as I said I would when he was drunk and lied to me about reading a link in one of my posts.
      At that time, I told him that I would delete any of his comments in one of my posts and other administrators could do as they pleased.
      I do let the comments he makes in the "Get It Off Your Chest" posts slide but I'm not interested in dealing with his emotional and psychological problems. They're just stupid distractions.
      If he seeks attention, he can open his own blog.

      Delete
    16. Warren, got it. Mystery solved. I wondered what he was ranting about

      Delete
    17. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    18. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  5. The only reason to support the FBI in 2022 America...

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  6. Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    2. The fish rots from the head, and the FBI is a fin of DoJ, that has other fins including ATF, US Marshalls, DEA, yada yada yada. They are the kingsmen from U.S.C.L.E. and they (along with the rest [especially the IC]) need a healthy budget check.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous,
      When you've lost Hanson, you've lost America...

      Indeed.

      The link you posted to the Hanson video tells us where America's justice system is today. Tragic!

      Delete
  7. I realize FBI bashing is the fashion of the week but Sen Rand Paul has a better suggestion (since the "no subpoena" and "planted documents" didn't pan out. Just repeal the Espionage Act or I suppose, any other violation the orange team might be accused of.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ronald,

      Can you understand, even while not agreeing, but can you understand how some people can look at events over the years and perceive a bias?

      Delete
    2. Andrew McCabe committed the same foul as general Flynn. Flynn is now disgraced, McCabe is an establishment made man who now pontificates authoritatively on CNN.

      Delete
    3. So, I'll go first and agree with the Hillary people who were extremely upset with Comey over his pronouncements on Hillary during a campaign.

      I don't know, and it could be an excuse making, but yeah I will concede that this could potentially have thrown the election to Trump. It's one of those things we'll never know.

      Delete
    4. Flynn will no doubt land on a cable news show, if that's what he desires.

      He's been pretty busy of late, on the Lindell-Bannon comedy club tour.

      Delete
    5. Lets face it. The US Government's bureaucratic Fisher Kings need some fools help if they're ever going to heal.

      Delete
    6. Like some one at Department of Justice who remembers what the word "justice" means.

      Delete
    7. ...before it became "Social Justice".

      Delete
    8. ...because THAT was the Fisher King's original vision... before all the "normal science" bureaucratic puzzle solvers "regulated" their way to its' current Left-Overton-Window-Shifted- and-enabled socially-just new definition.

      Delete
    9. ...and bureaucratically transformed America into a second-world Brazil.

      Delete
    10. CI, general Flynn has tragically gone over the edge. I hate to see it happen, I imagine going through what he went through could cause someone to become unbalanced.

      Delete
    11. "Ronald,
      Can you understand, even while not agreeing, but can you understand how some people can look at events over the years and perceive a bias?"

      Yes SF, I understand that mainly in the last 6 years (albeit a phenomenon), that some people, in fact many people, can look at events and actions and perceive a bias in government institutions.

      What's mind boggling to me is how this cult, and the good conservative/liberal hating roundtable café coffee sippers such as you included, can allow themselves to be persuaded by the think tanks to belly up for free drinks at the Propaganda Saloon and ork like trained seals to their piper's tune.

      The assaults on government institutions have been taken to new levels from the post Sharpie welder in-chief. Thing is, these folks that are looking and perceiving a bias honestly believe Biden is an illegitimated president occupying a seat he stole from Trump and attempting to use illegitimated powers to incarcerate the man they are convinced rightfully and legitimately won the Presidency.

      That's what these Tucker swigging indoctrinated basket of gullibles and misguided misfits actually believe.

      So yeah, I get it that some folks see what they want to see, regardless of the big picture of what is true and what isn't true.



      Delete
    12. @SF - Since I have witnessed Flynn at DIA……I’m not sorry to see it exactly, i

      Delete
    13. Stupid phones....

      @SF - Since I have witnessed Flynn at DIA……I’m not sorry to see it exactly, I actually expected it.

      @Ronald - Now ask yourself who benefits from the sometimes justified, sometimes not....assault on our institutions. You may have done so already. I have.

      Delete
    14. Ronald,

      I tried having an adult conversation with you, but you continue to traffic propaganda. GFY

      Delete
    15. Can’t help it if reality sucks for you.

      After Trump refusing to comply with a subpoena and refusing to cooperate, forcing the FBI to carry out a search warrant, listen to those AK sporting MAGA nuts shooting at and threatening the FBI. Listen to the “defund the FBI” (and IRS and any others who “police” the wealthy) from prominent lawmakers. Listen to right media and conservative blogs.

      Of course the FBI has its issues but this is yet another example of the right wing propaganda machine feeding the cult for their political objectives.

      Bashing the FBI is the fashion of the week.

      Delete
    16. Ronald, I really do wish you would treat each of us here as individuals, not a cartoon cut out.

      Anyway continue on with your low IQ red team blue team sports

      Red Baaaaaaaaaasaaaaad!

      Delete
    17. Don't know why you're so testy today SF. I've previously laid out quotes where the right wing media and R lawmakers went all out on selling the "no subpoena" scam. When that didn't work, it turned into "planted documents". Well, that didn't work so now Rand Paul is simply wanting to repeal the Espionage Act.

      It's like if they can't come up with a reason to discredit the FBI, they turn to making the alleged crime not so bad.

      This is just new week with a different version of the same ole movie.

      I'm not making this stuff up nor am I exaggerating the reaction of the MAGA nuts or lawmakers loyal to Trump.

      Delete
    18. Ronald, I did not ask you about the right-wing media. Also I am not repeating with the right wing media is saying.

      I asked you a question, between you and me. I didn't ask you to represent anyone else but yourself when I ask the question.

      I attempted to engage you as one adult to another. I now see what a big mistake that was. Carry on

      Delete
    19. SF, in response to my comment of:

      "I realize FBI bashing is the fashion of the week but Sen Rand Paul has a better suggestion (since the "no subpoena" and "planted documents" didn't pan out. Just repeal the Espionage Act or I suppose, any other violation the orange team might be accused of",

      you asked:

      "Can you understand, even while not agreeing, but can you understand how some people can look at events over the years and perceive a bias?"

      And I responded:

      "Yes SF, I understand that mainly in the last 6 years (albeit a phenomenon), that some people, in fact many people, can look at events and actions and perceive a bias in government institutions" and added "So yeah, I get it that some folks see what they want to see, regardless of the big picture of what is true and what isn't true".

      Not sure what got you all wadded.

      Can you understand, even while not agreeing, that some people can look at the events over the years and taking place now as efforts to discredit or dismantle (or defund) regulatory agencies that police the wealthy, the elite, and those in power?







      Delete
    20. Can you describe this nefarious GOP plot to "discredit or dismantle (or defund) regulatory agencies that police the wealthy, the elite, and those in power?"

      What agencies?

      Is that what dissenters on the left were doing when they railed against the CIA and FBI in the 60's and 70's?

      Delete
  8. Scott Adams presents, "How to fabricate the Hyper-Real: a primer for non-pattern-matching people..."

    ReplyDelete
  9. DoJ petitions to keep affadavit justifying raid of Mar-a-Lago hidden so as to keep their lies and selective leaks alive.... so much for the promised "transparency" in releasing Search Warrant materials.

    ReplyDelete
  10. When any of you Democrats can prove those documents weren't declassified, then perhaps there might be a point in continuing this discussion.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Not that it really matters but I'm reasonably sure she was alluding to a presidential run rather than comparing herself to Lincoln.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I remember when the Republican Party actually wanted conservatives in Congress.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Interesting read over at Gateway Pundit. Perhaps the problem isn't so much the FBI as the CIA plants inside the FBI's "Counter-Intelligence Division". Peter Strozck may never have been "fired" from the FBI..... as he never worked for them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Was the Mar-A-Lago raid related...?

      President Trump’s Memorandum issued on January 19, 2021:

      “At my request, on December 30, 2020, the Department of Justice provided the White House with a binder of materials related to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Crossfire Hurricane investigation. Portions of the documents in the binder have remained classified and have not been released to the Congress or the public. I requested the documents so that a declassification review could be performed and so I could determine to what extent materials in the binder should be released in unclassified form.

      I hereby declassify the remaining materials in the binder. This is my final determination under the declassification review and I have directed the Attorney General to implement the redactions proposed in the FBI’s January 17 submission and return to the White House an appropriately redacted copy.”


      ...and who ran "Crossfire Hurricane? CIA "Section Chief" Peter Strzok

      Delete
    2. Seems Congress knew about this...

      The CIA and FBI have implemented a number of reforms and new procedures at the CIA that are designed to detect the slightest of early warning signs of espionage. As a direct result of these reforms, anomalies were detected that ultimately led to the identification of Nicholson and his alleged espionage activities. These reforms include:

      The Chief of CIA's Counterespionage Group is a senior FBI official who has full access to CIA's most sensitive counterintelligence data and is thus in a position to fully coordinate the joint efforts of both organizations.

      The Chief of CIA's Counterespionage Group is assisted by deputies from both the security and operational disciplines at CIA and has at least one FBI Special Agent on the Counterespionage Group staff full-time.

      Section 811 of the Fiscal Year 1995 Intelligence Authorization Act requires immediate notification to the FBI whenever there are indications that classified information may have been disclosed without authorization to a foreign power.

      The position of Associate Deputy Director of Operations/Counterintelligence was created to ensure high-level focus on the Agency's counterintelligence and counterespionage effort. The Associate Deputy Director of Operations/Counterintelligence's duties include full-time coordination with the FBI, currently including weekly meetings with senior FBI officials in the FBI's National Security Division.

      New training initiatives to enhance and improve counterespionge efforts have been undertaken.
      Congress has provided increased resources for joint counterespionage efforts.

      Delete
    3. The Gang of Eight used to be the country's "insurance" that government agencies wouldn't be politicized. But after 9/11 and the Intelligence reforms that followed (including the creation of the NSD position), the Intelligence Communities "merged" and went "rogue".

      It all went south with the creation of the National Security Division...

      Delete
    4. A position that was created obstensively to allow FBI to "monitor" CIA treasonous activity is now used by CIA to conduct domestic surveillance and coordinate with FBI.

      Delete
  14. Dave Miller. The Ezekiel Protocol is my coinage. The definition for protocol is thus: the official procedure or system of rules governing affairs of state or diplomatic occasions: In this particular case, this involves the governance or affairs of God.

    Thank you for asking. Linguistics are meant to evolve alongside original meanings in the Greek, Latin, Hebrew... Sanskrit.

    Tammy Swofford

    ReplyDelete

  15. The old Republican Party was the one of "law and order?"

    At least that's what they said. But any objective person would be hard pressed to claim any GOP Admin since Ike actually represented with their actions law and order.

    Between the Nixon-Reagan-Bush-Bush-Trump Admins, the GOP is keeping well ahead of the Dems in the crime stats.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Double standards for law enforcement aren't a "respect for the law". There's either one standard, or there is no "law".

      Delete
  16. All classification of materials is done by the authority of and at the discretion of the Chief Execurive. If he says a document is declassified, it's declassified, whether or not a presidential minion changes the markings on said document. So suck eggs, democrats.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Classifications marks of original official documents don't magically disappear just because they have been declassified. They remain.

    On another note, the government is notoriously remiss in declassifying any document. Not just our government either. There are still many documents from WW2 that haven't been declassified even though they are not relevant except for historical reference.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Even Presidents can't declassify certain things, like the names of deployed spies (remember the left tried to "gotcha" Bush with Valerie Plame, who was not deployed) and national nuclear weapons and technology secrets.

    If that's what Trump was holding on to, the Justice Department should go ahead and announce their death penalty case against him.

    Presidents can classify and declassify and reclassify just about anything except the identities of our spies and nuclear secrets. Biden could say "everything Trump walked out of the White House with is classified / reclassified" and Trump would be screwed.

    But the search warrant itself lists three laws that don't require the information and files Trump stole to be classified or to have ever been classified. It's enough that he stole them and was found to have been in possession of them. Maybe he faces prison for that. If it was nuclear secrets or compromised deployed intelligence agents, get the gallows ready and hang the bastard.

    "What about" enforcing the law indeed. No Trumpster really wants that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Obama stole 300,000 documents. Where's the SWAT Team? Whataboutism when referring to OBVIOUS double standards in the application of the law is the very point. You want to be a nation of laws? Then either enforce the laws equally, or repeal them. Because to do otherwise is pure CYNICAL hypocrisy.

      Delete
    2. And the president can name every spy on the US payroll and as CINC, can hand our nuclear arsenal over to Iran. He either has that power, or he has none.

      Delete
    3. It's time you "Deep Staters" removed your heads from your asses. The Constitution gave the President these powers, not you.

      Delete
    4. Five eyes is four eyes too many.

      Delete
    5. False. The US President (any US President) while in office does not have such powers to legally expose US intelligence assets, military or nuclear secrets. The President is not free to commit treason or sedition. Should some foreign power or domestic uprising threaten to overthrow the US government, the Constitution does not even give the President the power to cede territory or surrender. The President certainly does not even have prima nocta powers lol. There are checks and balances in the US government. Congress funds, denies, and overrides Presidential vetoes at their leisure, as it should be, as they *make the laws.* They make the treaties, they make the rules. Not a mere President. Don't get it twisted. Power in the United States never has been and never will be in the hands of just one person. The US government doesn't even have to spy on its own citizens. They can have the UK, Canada, Australia, or New Zealand do that for them in a quid pro quo.

      "Obama stole 300,000 documents."

      Says who?

      Delete
    6. Obama, he's paying millions in "rent" on them to NARA now to keep from being arrested. You want to charge Trump rent, too? Why didn't you try that, cuz he has an (R) after his name?

      False? Lets "litigate" it then and see who wins. :)

      Delete
    7. "You want to be a nation of laws? Then either enforce the laws equally, or repeal them."

      Has an innocent person been tried and convicted? Has a guilty person been set free or given a pass? Without a trial, how do you know? Could it be that investigations find evidence to prosecute people that actually commited crimes or don't find evidence and thusly don't prosecute?

      Yes, that's exactly what has happened, and there's not a damned thing wrong with it. If you want so badly to try and convict someone, come up with evidence and witnesses that actually exist outside your imagination.

      That's how the rule of law works.

      Guilty until proven innocent is not the American way.

      Guilty even after having been proven innocent, the standard you seem to desire, would be bizarre in even the most totalitarian regimes on Earth.

      There is no "double standard."

      Delete
    8. ps - The press release originated long after the "rental agreement" was arrived at.

      Delete
    9. "Obama, he's paying millions in "rent" on them to NARA now to keep from being arrested."

      Who's charging him rent, lol? Did Trump forget to collect or change the terms?

      Obama didn't steal 300k documents. For really real. 300k documents, and you can't name one.

      Because you have nothing. Your imagination won't hold up in court. But you knew that already.

      Delete
    10. As required by the PRA, former President Obama has no control over where and how NARA stores the Presidential records of his Administration.

      You really should read your own links.more carefully and for comprehension, lol.

      Delete
    11. pps - Good luck seeing any of these "NARA owned" Obama documents. It literally takes YEARS for a FOIA request to get answered for one.

      Delete
    12. pps - Look at the Press Release date. Misinformation has a mother, and it's the deep state bureaucracy.

      Delete
    13. Obama has been hiding these documents from the public on the pretense of digitizing them for over five years now five eyes.

      Delete
    14. How many have been digitized? Zero.

      Delete
    15. pps - Does that letter mentioned above sound like "no control" to you?

      Delete
    16. Yes, it sounds precisely like Obama has no control over where and how NARA stores records. Hence, he had to send a letter and make a request. English is a wonderful language.

      Meanwhile, Team Trump's own internal communications verified the existence of the Russian PeePee Tapes long before Michael Steele reported the rumor of them.

      So Trump likes to be peed on. Weird, but okay. Apparently he's shamed enough to hawk classified information to the Russians to keep the tapes unreleased.

      Delete
  19. @ Five Eyes,
    Seriously? You're going to cite Roger Sollenberger?
    Let me help you out a little. There are lies, damned lies, Roger Sollenberger and TDS. You seem to be suffering from the last.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Pretty sure Sollenberger is not the only one vindicated by the Mueller Report revelations that Team Trump was scrambling to stop the Russians from releasing their compromising tapes of Trump getting pissed on by Moscow hookers long before Michael Steele came along and added to the counterintelligence probe into Trump's ties to Russia.

    You can "read it or remain ignorant," but you can't explain away the efforts of Trump's inner circle making efforts to stop the Russians from releasing something that allegedly wouldn't exist.

    Think about it. Suppose someone told you that they have a video of you having sex with a baby rhinoceros. Do you have your people fight to keep the tape from being released, or do you sit comfortably in the knowledge that you've never had sex with a rhinoceros, baby or otherwise?

    Team Trump scrambled to squash a nothing? Really? How is that logical?

    To quote Sollenberger. "I know the Trump Piss Tape exists. Aristotle told me."

    ReplyDelete
  21. Slander and libel laws exist, and Trump is litigious if anything.

    Why hasn't Trump tried to sue both Christopher Steele and every major media outlet on the planet?

    Psst. It's because Trump sent his own team out to stop the Russians from releasing videos of Russian hookers pissing on him.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Defamation lawsuits brought by "public figures", reach an almost level of burden of proof and are almost always dismissed out of hand. That's why you never actually see them. They are a waste of time, money and resources.
    Funny thing about the "pee pee tape". No one claims to have it and no one will claim, under oath, to have actually seen it. Only claims that someone else saw it and told them about it. The original claim came from a Russian and apparent Russian asset that was the basis for the fraudulent "Trump Collusion" hoax and admitted that he had never seen such a tape and was a claim of one of his "contacts". He is presently under indictment on other Federal charges.
    Don't bother to reply, you are a waste of my time.

    ReplyDelete

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