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Friday, June 2, 2017

Patronizing Inclusiveness


From Student Union Wants to Ban Clapping and Cheering Because it Excludes Deaf People (dated April 28, 2017):
Britain’s largest national student union has told attendees of its annual conference they would face “consequences” for cheering and clapping because these forms of expression exclude deaf people....Instead of clapping, the students were advised to use “jazz hands” – a gesture when people wave their hands in the air – as it’s believed to be more inclusive to people with hearing problems....This isn’t the first time the student union has tackled the issue of clapping. In the past, some NUS [National Union of Students] events banned clapping because it might “trigger anxiety”.
Inanity in the name of diversity!

In my father's words, "pure, unadulterated monkey business."

17 comments:

  1. The students are patronizing the handicapped, who for the most part have learned to cope with their disabilities.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mustang,
      In my experience, insofar as is possible, handicapped individuals resent being patronized. They view such patronizing as demeaning and insulting.

      I'm including how my husband copes in this answer. Mr. AOW does need certain kinds of help, but resents "being babied" or "being treated like a retard."

      Delete
  2. My first thought after reading your headline was this famous quotation from Groucho Marx:

    "I would never want to belong to any club that wanted to have me as a member."

    Leftist-activists don't really want to "help" anyone, what they REALLY want to do is CONDESCEND to those perceived as "deprived" or "needy."

    These leftist-activists then use their self-generated aura of ersatz "concern" and "compassion" as a good excuse to DOMINATE snd DICTATE TO the objects ot their self-righteous pity.

    In short leftist-activists are smarmy, unctuous, palpably insincere, would-be TYRANTS.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FT,
      Leftist-activists don't really want to "help" anyone, what they REALLY want to do is CONDESCEND to those perceived as "deprived" or "needy."

      They also want to cover themselves with glory: "Hey! Look at me! Look a what a good person I am!" Pfffft.

      Delete
  3. Beyond belief. It gets more bizarre by the day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bunkerville,
      I've gotten to the point that I don't follow "the news" as much as I did. Too damn bizarre!

      Delete
  4. Clapping and "jazz hands" sounds exactly the same to someone who's deaf. They're not blind nor stupid. It'd be nice if Leftists stopped treated them as if they were.

    - CI

    ReplyDelete
  5. I know many who are handicapped in several different ways. Not a one of these individuals, including a nonverbal autistic student who has been in my classes since September 2014, wishes to be "treated differently."

    In fact, my autistic student requested no IEP dispensation this year (his junior year), other than to have his private teacher/tutor/facilitator read his answers aloud after he spelled out his answers on the letter board. And with the IEP removed, he earned A's! Sure, the A's he earned in his junior year were not A+'s. But he was still comfortably in the A range.

    BTW, this autistic student has been taking classes at our local community college since September 2016. And earning A's, too.

    I could go on and on as to the ways this student has "normalized." I kept demanding that he participate more, including standing with the class for class photos. Such normalization would never have occurred had we catered to his disabilities in smarmy ways.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Furthermore, it is one thing to make necessary accommodations. It's another thing entirely to be patronizing. Why can't people see that?

    ReplyDelete
  7. From the BBC:

    "Nona Buckley-Irvine is general secretary at the London School of Economics Students' Union (LSE SU).
    She told Newsbeat: "Jazz hands are used throughout NUS in place of clapping as a way to show appreciation of someone's point without interrupting or causing disturbance.""

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Duck,
      Apparently, applause can also trigger anxiety.

      That's just plain stupid.

      Delete
  8. Does this mean that any and all forms of audio communication or, for example, music are discriminatory toward the hearing impaired?

    ReplyDelete
  9. So how does replacing clapping with a visual gesture help blind students feel included?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Baysider,
      "Include" one group, "exclude" another.

      This pandering crap needs to stop!

      Delete
  10. My first job was at a Home Depot like store and I was working the customer service desk one day when a deaf woman came in to return a faucet. She complained that the dripping was driving her crazy. I was very young, but at least I prefaced my question with a perfunctory, "I don't mean to be rude... but how do you know?" She laughed and said she could see the drip, drip, drip and it drove her crazy. From them on, she would only deal with me at the store. Years later, my sister in law, who had dabbled with the deaf commumity, told me that I had done deaf humor. They don't want to be treated any differently than anybody else and she was pleased that I had not been afraid to ask a questions most might be intimidated to ask. The impertinence of youth.

    ReplyDelete

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