Sunday, January 6, 2013

January 6: Epiphany

(If you must have politics, please keep scrolling)

January 6 is also known as Three Kings Day and the last of the Twelve Days of Chrismtas.

The Bible is silent as to how many magi visited the Holy Family and exactly when they came to present their gifts. Nevertheless, the carol most associated with this day is hauntingly beautiful:


Words to the carol below the fold.
We three kings of Orient are
Bearing gifts we traverse afar
Field and fountain, moor and mountain
Following yonder star

O Star of wonder, star of night
Star with royal beauty bright
Westward leading, still proceeding
Guide us to thy Perfect Light

Born a King on Bethlehem's plain
Gold I bring to crown Him again
King forever, ceasing never
Over us all to rein

O Star of wonder, star of night
Star with royal beauty bright
Westward leading, still proceeding
Guide us to Thy perfect light

Frankincense to offer have I
Incense owns a Deity nigh
Pray'r and praising, all men raising
Worship Him, God most high

O Star of wonder, star of night
Star with royal beauty bright
Westward leading, still proceeding
Guide us to Thy perfect light

Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume
Breathes of life of gathering gloom
Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying
Sealed in the stone-cold tomb

O Star of wonder, star of night
Star with royal beauty bright
Westward leading, still proceeding
Guide us to Thy perfect light

Glorious now behold Him arise,
King and God and sacrifice,
Heaven sings, "Hallelujah!"
Hallejujah!" Earth replies.

O Star of wonder, star of night
Star with royal beauty bright
Westward leading, still proceeding
Guide us to Thy perfect light.

9 comments:

  1. That is a beautiful song, and the Myrrh verse always hits me as a poignant reminder there in the middle of all the joy and celebration.

    Although not churchy, The Ray Conniff Singers do a beautiful job on this song as well.

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  2. AOW, I caught your comment on "take your daughter to work day".
    That's my niece's phone. Believe me, no one is crazy enough to give the grand niece her own. We do spend a lot of time worrying how we're going to survive her as a teenager though.

    I like the street scene shot also. I do look for settings were the dynamic is very ambiguous. Nothing apparent but a certain threat well below the surface.

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  3. One of my favorites.

    Debbie
    Right Truth
    http://www.righttruth.typepad.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Duck,
    Your niece is cute as a button!

    I'm glad to hear that she doesn't really have a smart phone.

    As for "On the Boulevard," I agree with you about the threat below the surface; I could feel it. Maybe it has something to do with the body language of the man.

    But I also like the lines in the photo -- an element of subdued chaos or, perhaps, rebellion to come.

    You do have a good idea for this type of photography, Duck.

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  5. The boys and young men are always a treat to behold, AOW. I have hard time getting used to the short shrift given to the "O" beginning each repetition of the chorus.

    In every church I've ever been associated with we always gave that O six full counts -- three on each of two notes -- before proceeding with the rest.

    For a completely different view of the Three Kings come to my blog and hear Hugo Wolf's setting of Geothe's good-natured, rather humorous text.

    I posted the same song performed first by soprano, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf then by basso Franz Crass.

    The contrast between them is striking, and should prove interesting.

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  6. One of my very favorite carols!

    Beautiful!

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  7. Also, can you BELIVE the voices coming out of those kids? WOW!

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  8. The Bible may not specifically refer to three KINGS, but it does list three GIFTS

    1. Gold

    2. Frankincense

    3. Myrrh

    I'm pretty sure that suggests to most "interpreters" the presence and participation of THREE men.

    Anyway, it's a long held tradition, and why would mere numbers count when SPIRIT is all that matters?

    Often they're called The Magi, which means they were MAGICIANS.

    I was taught to refer to them as The Three Wise Men.

    And weren't they given three specific names -- Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazaar?

    Where hose names came from I'm not sure, but they've been around a long time.

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  9. "January 6 is also known as Three Kings Day..."

    HUH! I thought it was just my Birthday. When did those kings horn into the act? Phah!

    ReplyDelete

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