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Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Recommended Reading

See Feds Order Colleges to Stop Checking Criminal/School Discipline History Because it Discriminates Against Minorities (dated May 20, 2016).

New buzz word therefrom: “justice-involved individuals.”

There is also the following in the linked article (emphasis mine):
Colleges and universities are to take it a step further by offering students with criminal histories special support services. This is to include targeted academic and career guidance as well as counseling, legal aid services, mentoring and coaching. “Institutions should recruit and train peer mentors with previous justice involvement to work with justice-involved students to ensure a smooth transition to postsecondary education and provide support and resources throughout their time at the college or university,” the new directive states. “These peer mentors could begin their work by acting as navigators who help acclimate justice-involved students to the educational institutions.”

24 comments:

  1. The federal government is creating a toxic public environment. I can only conclude this is part of some grand scheme to fundamentally transform the Progressive State of Amreeka.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The "war on drugs" and harsh mandatory sentencing has already accomplished a transformation.

      The difficult part is trying to undo the damage.

      Delete
    2. Hey, look! It's the Turtle Duck!

      I would ask you to clarify your position on heroine and cocaine coming across the border, but I don't want to create a hostile environment that sends you scurrying for a safe space.

      Delete
    3. Legalize all drugs and make treating overdoses a capital crime. Boom problem solved after a few months.

      Delete
    4. I'd put the emphasis on removing prison sentences for non violent drug crime. You've essentially created a whole class that are locked out of jobs and these are the offenders the article is probably referring to.

      Interdiction has been a massive failure and will continue to be a money pit. When there is that much profit involved, interdiction guarantees only corruption. We sink money into heroin interdiction and what happens, addiction rates are through the roof.

      Now, is street heroin addiction a different vector than prescription opioid addiction? Could be. It would probably be worth a small portion of what we piss away on interdiction to find out.
      Myself, I think our street heroin interdiction is so effective that prescription opioid addicts switch because the street heroin is so cheap. It's everywhere.

      Do I have solution? No.
      But the idea that interdiction is an effective prevention method is no more than a primitive idea.

      Delete
    5. One of the way to help high schoolers not to "lose their way" is to remind them of the disclaimer on college acceptance papers, a disclaimer along the lines of "Criminal conviction can lead to the rescinding of your admission."

      In fact, colleges admit applicants on the basis of their high school grades through the first semester of students''senior year. After that date, the threat of forfeiting admission helps to keep many seniors from going off the rails; this has been true for at least three decades.

      Delete
    6. How could that be true, AOW, when it is the FACULTIES of most colleges and universities who have, themselves, "gone off the rails?"

      "Higher Education" today is little more than a series of Indoctrination Centers for Marxian Propaganda –– many of them covered in ivy.

      Delete
    7. I'd put the emphasis on removing prison sentences for non violent drug crime. You've essentially created a whole class that are locked out of jobs.......

      But the idea that interdiction is an effective prevention method is no more than a primitive idea.


      See.....you can be reasonable at times. It's a shame that you looked at this from an aspect of mere pragmatism, rather than fundamental liberty......but it's a start.

      Delete
    8. Ducky,

      Cut the crap and answer my question. Do we continue trying to stop drugs coming across our border? Or do we give up and let it all come it? Please, for once, give us a simple yes or no.

      I have agreed with you many times that we should not be locking up petty non-violent criminals. Drug use and simple possession should be decriminalized, even as we go after the pushers. I also believe anyone caught bringing drugs into the country should be machine-gunned at the border.

      Back over to you.


      Delete
    9. We might as well cut it way back since it's so ineffective.

      You think there's a throttle on availability in America?
      The supply is there and demand is not being restrained.


      You do like those simple answers.

      Delete
    10. Duck,
      I'd put the emphasis on removing prison sentences for non violent drug crime. You've essentially created a whole class that are locked out of jobs and these are the offenders the article is probably referring to.

      The key word = probably.

      If, like the governor of Virginia with his blanket reinstatement of the right to vote to felons without consideration as to the severity of the criminal offenses, this measure on the part of the Department of Education doesn't take into consideration the severity of the offenses on the part of "justice-involved individuals," the measure is a recipe for disaster on college campuses -- and, as I mentioned above -- for high schoolers as well.

      It should be strictly up to the colleges what the criteria for admission are.

      Delete
    11. SF,
      I see that you have an answer from Duck: let the drugs flood in.

      Sheesh.

      Delete
    12. AOW, Yup. This is a brain on leftwing progressivism.

      And then he throws the diversionary stink bomb saying I like simple answers.

      I do want straight answers from people I'm debating with, but sensible people on all sides realize there is no magic bullet for this drug epidemic that has metastasized under Obama's failed presidency.

      Stopping it from coming across our borders is but one piece, just as cops on the street doesn't "solve" the crime problem.

      We do need to treat addicts humanely, and leave simple users alone, but we need to bring the pain to the purveyors.

      Delete
  2. Doing all they can to turn America into a science fiction nightmare, where the U.S. turns into some sort of survival game.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Replies
    1. As I said in another comment: "failed model."

      Delete
  4. A Tim Hawkins classic straight to the point:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LO2eh6f5Go0&feature=youtu.be

    ReplyDelete
  5. FT,
    most colleges and universities who have, themselves, "gone off the rails"

    I can't disagree. Nevertheless, a college education still remains as a primary key for most to have upward mobility and enjoy a high standard of living.

    ReplyDelete
  6. BTW, I spoke with a social worker yesterday. She told me that this model of having "justice-involved" mentors for "justice-involved individuals" is a failed model. She was adamant with her statement -- and she is an expert in the field.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When 'justice-involved mentors' were fathers it worked better.

      Delete
  7. Beamish,
    Legalize all drugs and make treating overdoses a capital crime. Boom problem solved after a few months.

    Ingenious!

    Of course, the reality is that the ACA provides low-cost treatment for those using drugs -- those who got caught or those who voluntarily entered the treatment programs, that is. Drug addiction has been deemed "an illness" for decades. And America as a whole has moved to the idea that those who have illnesses have THE RIGHT to treatment.

    ReplyDelete
  8. CI,
    Depends on how far a user goes with his "nonviolent" crime.

    Many who use are petty thieves -- or worse. Hire them, and they dip into the till.

    Had this very problem within my extended family to the point that one family member ("S") lost every job she had even though none of the employers ever prosecuted because she was the mother of three children. FINALLY she quit using, and she's been clean now for over 10 years. The Mormon Church stepped in and helped a great deal with all of this. "S" was able to get clean and go to college to become a certified medical assistant (diagnostic codes). No federal program helped her at all, nor did she seek assistance for the drug problem of her own making.

    Another family member did time in the penitentiary for drug use compounded by embezzling and laundering money for Hezbollah. She's done her time -- and the penitentiary system saw to it that she has a job. She threw away her opportunity to get a college education -- not because no college would admit her (She was admitted several times as part of a federally-funded outreach program), but rather because she literally has holes in her gray matter. Oh, and she's still using; unlikely to get caught for a while because she's no longer on parole or probation. Meanwhile, her mother has full and permanent custody of the three-year-old, a precious little girl who couldn't remain with her mother because of hypodermic needles lying all over the floor.

    These stories are repeated all over America today.

    ReplyDelete

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