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Monday, October 27, 2014

Duncan Lied To The 2nd ER Nurse

Read the article and watch the 60 Minutes video HERE.

Did Duncan also lie to the first nurse he saw two days earlier at Texas Presbyterian Hospital?

49 comments:

  1. I don't understand why he would lie the second time if his objective was to get admitted for treatment.
    As far as the first encounter, the hospital hasn't denied that he was symptomatic and admitted he had been in Liberia.

    Bottom line is that the procedures were flawed and there have been steps taken to tighten them.

    Still, nobody infected in the U.S. has died and we still seem to be driven by fear rather than reason.
    Witness the treatment of the nurse in Newark who absolutely deserved to be treated with respect for her sacrifice and what does she get? A politically motivated response from Cuomo and Christie, two of the worst hacks in government and beacons for what has gone wrong.

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    Replies
    1. Maybe you can explain why the US government is quarantining US troops who worked in Liberia and are asymptomatic, in Italy?

      Is their Commanding general a hack, too?

      Delete
    2. Oh, wait, THEY should not be treated with heroes or respected. They get paid their $700 a month. THAT should be compensation enough!

      No wonder Italian authorities escorted them into isolation in HAZMAT suits.

      Delete
    3. My bad, their commanding general actually works for the HACK in Chief, Barrack Obama.

      Delete
    4. Did somebody in the White House not call the Pentagon and tell them that there was a no quarantine policy in effect?

      Or do volunteers to Africa get a "pass" and the conscripted a "Go Directly to Jail" card?

      Delete
    5. I know! Nurses know howto read thermometers, and troops from the 101st Airborne don't have the proper training.

      Delete
    6. Is the distinction in their disparate treatment due to "fear" or "reason", ducky?

      Delete
    7. Ever read a graph plotted on the Logarithmic Scale

      Have no fear... Democrats are here!

      Delete
    8. That nurse is too stupid and selfish to be in the line of work she is in.

      A respected Ebola doctor walked around NYC not knowing he was infected. That should give everyone returning pause.

      Give such circumstances, if I were returning, I would demand to be quarantined. I could not imagine the tragedy of infecting and perhaps killing my family.

      Delete
    9. That's right Silver, a doctor trained in communicable disease treatment knowingly risked the health of his fiancee. Come on.
      Why not just admit the guy knows more about this than we do and would not put people at risk.

      The nurse didn't even register symptoms and she was treated like crap. That's the way to encourage volunteers. Cuomo and Christie, two of the biggest political dirt bags, should be ashamed.

      Delete
    10. She registered a 102 fever. Twice.

      Oh, that's right, she felt "flushed".

      Delete
    11. Make that 101. Twice... from her OWN account:

      I called my family to let them know that I was OK. I was hungry and thirsty and asked for something to eat and drink. I was given a granola bar and some water. I wondered what I had done wrong.

      Four hours after I landed at the airport, an official approached me with a forehead scanner. My cheeks were flushed, I was upset at being held with no explanation. The scanner recorded my temperature as 101.

      The female officer looked smug. “You have a fever now,” she said.

      I explained that an oral thermometer would be more accurate and that the forehead scanner was recording an elevated temperature because I was flushed and upset.

      I was left alone in the room for another three hours. At around 7 p.m., I was told that I must go to a local hospital. I asked for the name and address of the facility. I realized that information was only shared with me if I asked.

      Eight police cars escorted me to the University Hospital in Newark. Sirens blared, lights flashed. Again, I wondered what I had done wrong.

      I had spent a month watching children die, alone. I had witnessed human tragedy unfold before my eyes. I had tried to help when much of the world has looked on and done nothing.

      At the hospital, I was escorted to a tent that sat outside of the building. The infectious disease and emergency department doctors took my temperature and other vitals and looked puzzled. “Your temperature is 98.6,” they said. “You don't have a fever but we were told you had a fever.”

      After my temperature was recorded as 98.6 on the oral thermometer, the doctor decided to see what the forehead scanner records. It read 101. The doctor felts my neck and looked at the temperature again. “There’s no way you have a fever,” he said. “Your face is just flushed.”

      Delete
    12. Ducky,

      The fact remains that this doctor, who is experienced in the disease, messed up. Does this snotty, self-absorbed nurse think she is smarter than everyone else?

      This should cause us to pause and reconsider. What is inhumane or violating people's rights about making them stay in place for a reasonable amount of time upon returning?

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. 21 Day quarantine? For men and women who "deserve to be treated with respect for their sacrifice" according to Ducky?

      Nonsense. Send them all to Ducky's house so he can congratulate them for their sacrifices.

      Delete
  3. You know that JCS, they are SO political in their recommendations!

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    Replies
    1. Obama imagines himself the chairman of "Doctors without Borders" when his term expires at the end of 2016.

      Delete
  4. This is a serious situation and I don't believe any of us needs fear getting Ebola, however not to take extreme precautions seems rather stupid and even silly to me.
    The idea that there are those who don't think people should be quarantined over THERE before coming here is highly stupid, too. At least consider it and modify if necessary.
    Civil liberties can't really enter into this....there's no time for civil liberties; we need to treat mindfully, treat kindly and treat diligently. One nurse's feelings being hurt doesn't much matter compared to possibility of epidemic in a country of 300 million.
    Is Duncan's family still suing?

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    Replies
    1. I find the following hysterical piece from the liberal press revealing:

      But the adjustment fails to undo the basic badness of the idea—the plopping of a heavy-handed, ineffective, fear-enhancing new dictate right into the middle of a public-health emergency that is being handled just fine, thank you, by the people trained to handle it.

      Since the outbreak began, now 11,000 cases and 5,000 deaths ago, much has been written about this being a perfect storm of infection, fragile local governments emerging from long civil wars, and international hesitancy. Tragically, this characterization appears apt.


      If the problem is being handled "just fine" from the people "trained to handle it"... why are there now 11,000 cases and 5,000 deaths?

      The lovers of "science" are wearing no clothes.

      Delete
    2. A short 3 months ago, the "total cases" was only 1,000. There been a 10x increase in that number in a single calendar quarter. And we're on track for another 10x increase in cases (to over 1 million) in the next three months.

      Delete
    3. But please, don't be alarmed. The professionals are handling this whole epidemic "just fine". Trust us. These are not the droids you've been searching for...

      Delete
    4. Z,
      I don't believe any of us needs fear getting Ebola

      I agree (1) as long as the outbreak doesn't spread too much in the United States or (2) if "we" are not one of us reading this is not a nurses or other medical provider. However, air travel is a serious vector for spreading Ebola. It is indeed " a small world."

      Is Duncan's family still suing?

      Yes, as far as I've heard. I haven't been on the web today very much, though.

      BTW, my primary purpose in posting so often about Ebola is to show just how incompetent and unwieldy the federal bureaucracy is. These federal mouthpieces -- including Obama -- cannot control the spread of any pathogen merely by making pronouncements, soothing or otherwise.

      Delete
    5. Joe,
      A short 3 months ago, the "total cases" was only 1,000. There been a 10x increase in that number in a single calendar quarter. And we're on track for another 10x increase in cases (to over 1 million) in the next three months.

      The tale of such a pathogen for which there is no vaccine.

      Those who disbelieve that reality so believe at their own peril.

      Delete
    6. I bet there will be one quickly.

      There was work going on that was shelved but I'll guarantee it starts up again and we have a vaccine within the year.

      Delete
    7. At the current rate of progression of the disease, in one year, every man-woman and child on the planet will have had ebola already, ducky. Who will you give the vaccine to, survivors with immunity?

      Delete
  5. According to a Today Show poll located by MRCTV, 94 percent of Americans agree that there should be a mandatory quarantine.

    I wonder if it was a "scientific" poll...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Duck,
    I'm finally getting around to responding to the comment that you left much earlier today.

    Duck,
    Bottom line is that the procedures were flawed

    Duncan was the first Ebola case within the United States -- other than Ebola patients specifically brought in and prepared for in advance.

    Texas Presbyterian Hospital was taken by surprise, I think.

    I don't understand why he would lie the second time if his objective was to get admitted for treatment.

    He was taken by ambulance. Did he choose to go, or did he have no choice?

    Witness the treatment of the nurse in Newark who absolutely deserved to be treated with respect for her sacrifice and what does she get?

    As medical professional, she knew that was coming in from an Ebola Hot Zone. After what she witnessed there, I would think that she might have been more understanding about the alarm that can ensue even if the chance of contracting Ebola is very small. After all, she herself witnessed horrible, agonizing deaths. Furthermore, she knew the risks she was taking when she went to the Ebola Hot Zone.

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    Replies
    1. The nurse was a far-Left whackjob with political ties to the DNC and CDC. She was as typical a medical professional as Rosa Parks was of secretaries.

      Delete
    2. It turns out that Kaci Hickox is a registered democrat and Obama supporter who works for the CDC. "The nurse currently quarantined in New Jersey is an employee for the Centers for Disease Control and a registered Democrat with a history of left-wing advocacy," reports GotNews.com

      The LinkedIn.com page that has since been scrubbed is:
      www.linkedin.com/pub/kaci-hickox/30/793/7b8
      - See more at: http://www.libertynewsonline.com/article_301_36452.php#sthash.8xEDDBhl.dpuf

      Delete
    3. Moere on Kaci Hickox... from CDC Website:

      2014 EIS Conference

      The 2014 Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Conference was held April 28 to May 1, 2014, in Atlanta. We are pleased that this year’s conference again contained a session dedicated to TB.

      Three EIS officers from DTBE’s International Research and Programs Branch (IRPB) were featured during the session, which was held on Tuesday, April 29. First year officers Dr. Tyson Volkmann presented “Tuberculosis and Excess Alcohol Use in the United States, 1997–2012” and Dr. Aditya Sharma presented “Characterization of Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium africanum — United States, 2004–2012”; second year officer Dr. Niki Alami presented “Childhood Tuberculosis — Botswana, 2008–2012.”

      Additional presentations were given by state-based officers from the Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development (DSEPD), including “Opportunities for Improved Detection and Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection Among Veterans — Western United States, January 2010–July 2013,” presented by Dr. Tara Perti, and “Contact Investigation of Healthcare Personnel Exposed to Maternal and Neonatal Tuberculosis — Clark County, Nevada, 2013” given by Kaci Hickox.

      She's a CDC policy hack

      Delete
    4. She’s now serving a two-year postgraduate fellowship with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Las Vegas. - See more at: http://www.uta.edu/unbranded/alumni/kaci-hickox.php#sthash.rHToE0aj.dpuf

      Delete
    5. Thersites,
      It turns out that Kaci Hickox is a registered democrat and Obama supporter who works for the CDC.

      Of course!

      Is it my imagination, or does Hickox have an entitlement mentality?

      She surely is enjoying all the attention she's getting right now, too.

      I also find it revealing about some of the information about her having been scrubbed.

      Delete
    6. Must be a great stroke of luck to have CDC employees in positions to support CDC policies.

      Delete
    7. Thersites,
      No doubt -- and cooperative enemedia as well.

      Delete
    8. from her CDC talk, she would appear to be an expert in "contact investigations". Given CDC quarantine policies... she's going to keep herself exponentially more employed well into the next year when there will be no one left to pay her government salary.

      Delete
  7. Let's think about vaccines.

    We are all aware, are we not, that effective vaccines require trial periods, many of which often result in failures?

    We are all aware, are we not, that safe vaccines cannot be rushed?

    Medicine today can work wonders by the standards of yesteryear. But developing a vaccination is not necessarily a snap.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. About vaccine development:

      Vaccine development is a long, complex process, often lasting 10-15 years and involving a combination of public and private involvement....

      More at the above link.

      From the CDC:

      The general stages of the development cycle of a vaccine are:

      Exploratory stage
      Pre-clinical stage
      Clinical development
      Regulatory review and approval
      Manufacturing
      Quality control

      Clinical development is a three-phase process. During Phase I, small groups of people receive the trial vaccine. In Phase II, the clinical study is expanded and vaccine is given to people who have characteristics (such as age and physical health) similar to those for whom the new vaccine is intended. In Phase III, the vaccine is given to thousands of people and tested for efficacy and safety.

      Many vaccines undergo Phase IV formal, ongoing studies after the vaccine is approved and licensed.


      Rushing the process courts problems -- perhaps disasters.

      Delete
    2. This is total amount of time we have... if left un-quarantined.

      Delete
    3. You'd better alert them in Ebola Central because there are medicines finally going over there and I thought some vaccines were going?
      I'm hoping that things aren't quite as grim as some of us think and I'm cheered that so few have it at this point, even none of the family LIVING and sharing the bathroom, etc., with Duncan before he was hospitalized.

      Delete
  8. http://news.yahoo.com/governors-back-home-quarantine-ebola-workers-063858837.html

    Well, I'll be darned; a glimpse of sanity. An ABUNDANCE of carefulness...

    I'm trying to think of a downside to being too careful. With EBOLA.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Z,
      Being confined is a great inconvenience. However, doesn't the public good trump that inconvenience? The Left is forever saying so!

      If Ebola "gets loose" in the United States, there will be mass panic, during which we may see the worst side of Americans regardless of political alignment. Now, I doubt that Ebola will get loose. But should we take the chance?

      Did you see this comment from Thersites?

      At the current rate of progression of the disease, in one year, every man-woman and child on the planet will have had ebola...

      I'm no statistician, but I do know that when epidemics get rolling, they explode.

      Delete
  9. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/27/ebola-quarantine_n_6057138.html
    That's the dumbest thing I've heard. Maybe this doc wouldn't want to be quarantined, but what's he there for, to help people, or...?

    And, of course, since I commented above about Christy and Cuomo fighting for quarantine, the liberal Cuomo's backing down. SURPRISE!
    There can be no 'too careful' so now they're coming up with excuses where it works against us.
    man.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Z,
      The only way to slow down and eventually stop an epidemic pathogen is quarantine. That's the way the science works!

      Delete
    2. Liberal Cuomo? Are you at all familiar with politics on the East coast?
      The statement is absurd.

      What you are seeing is two hacks trying to make political points.

      Now I still don't see why detaining an asymptomatic nurse trying to change planes to get home to Maine and treating her like dirt when there is such a need for volunteers in Africa is something you find laudable unless you are simply reacting out of mindless fear.

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. See your Ebola and raise you two Benghazi's, Jersey.

      Delete
  11. Let's see how the D.C. area reacts: Patient Isolated At UMMC For Ebola Testing (Baltimore, Maryland). Ebola test results pending as I type this in.

    ReplyDelete
  12. CDC's isolation unit in DC/MD treated Nurse #2. UMMC should put the new patient in a cab and foot the $30 cab fare.

    ReplyDelete

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