Header Image (book)

aowheader.3.2.gif

Sunday, June 10, 2018

The Physics Of Brass Instruments

(For politics, please scroll down)




Enjoy listening to Canadian Brass.  No need to understand the physics behind the instruments!


One more selection below the fold.

6 comments:

  1. Heh heh heh... I've never really understood how a horn can be so loud. The embouchure is so tiny. Same with the old horn gramaphones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jez,
      I'm glad that you found this informative.

      Delete
    2. It didn't explain it, though!
      I guess it's like a lever (as the wave front expands to fill the widening horn, the pressure differenrial drops). And that's louder because? The wider area makes it better at dispersing through the room? Not sure, and anyway even the humble lever can make me go crosseyed if i think about it too much...

      Delete
    3. Jez,
      The physics of music is complicated. It has been explained to me in detail many times. I don't understand it, so I just go on and enjoy the music.

      Delete
  2. Now I am glad for sure I chose the Saxophone for band...though I got stuck with the baritone sax and had to sit with the brass, and joined them with much of the um pahs.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beyond splendid! The Bach Toccata and Fugue in D-minor is one of my least favorite among Bach's Great Organ Works, –– probably because it's so famous, too easily and cheaply associated with "Monster Movies," and done to death by organists too eager to please the crowd –– but these incredible virtuosi literally breathe new life into it.

    Their ensemble is astonishingly precise, their phrasing is brilliant, their dynamic gradations and tempo fluctuations are so beautifully plotted and so elegantly performed they bring a freshness and vitality to this hoary old chestnut that tempts me to think this transcrition for brass enseble is in many ways more satisfying than Bach's original version for organ solo. Also, the brass ensemble produces a greater variety of tone colors than any organist could produce on even the finest instrument.

    ReplyDelete

We welcome civil dialogue at Always on Watch. Comments that include any of the following are subject to deletion:
1. Any use of profanity or abusive language
2. Off topic comments and spam
3. Use of personal invective