Header Image (book)

aowheader.3.2.gif

Sunday, April 1, 2018

My Redeemer Lives!

[For politics, please scroll down]


From Handel's Messiah, Lynne Dawson sings the aria below, Stephen Cleobury conducting the Brandenburg Consort:


I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. And though worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God. (Job 19:25-26)

For now is Christ risen from the dead, the first fruits of them that sleep. (I Corinthians 15:20)

From Handel's Messiah, Stephen Cleobury conducting the Brandenburg Consort:


Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah
Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah

For the lord God omnipotent reigneth
Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah
For the lord God omnipotent reigneth
Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah
For the lord God omnipotent reigneth
Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah

Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah
Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah
(For the lord God omnipotent reigneth)
Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah

For the lord God omnipotent reigneth
(Hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah)
Hallelujah

The kingdom of this world;
Is become
The kingdom of our Lord,
And of His Christ
And of His Christ

And He shall reign for ever and ever
And he shall reign forever and ever
And he shall reign forever and ever
The full Messiah concert below the fold, Stephen Cleobury conducting the Brandenburg Consort, with Lynne Dawson, soprano; Hillary Summers, alto; John Mark Ainsley, tenor; Alastair Miles, bass:

18 comments:

  1. May your home be filled with unwavering hope for all the days to come. Happy Easter to you and Mr. AOW.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  3. ___________ Wonderings ___________

    Baskets filled with flimsy paper grass
    Underlying gaudy pastel treats ––
    Necromancer’s jellied, jewel-like sweets ––
    Nestled next to marvels chickens pass
    Youngsters view with wonder all agog.
    ’Tis the figure of a small brown rodent though ––
    Sweetened chocolate hare –– that steals the show.
    His melting presence, like the rich eggnog
    Older folks think makes their spirits rise,
    Loosens all constraints upon the the tots
    Insuring Bunny’s sudden swift demise.
    Does delighting as we do in such behavior ––
    A self-indulgence seen un wholesale lots ––
    Yield a greater closeness to the Savior ––
    Strengthen future prospects for the tots?


    ~ FreeThinke, The Sandpiper


    ReplyDelete
  4. Wishing you and Mr AOW a wonderful day. Happy Easter!

    ReplyDelete
  5. ____________ Victim Victorious ____________

    They took and tried, and tortured, then they killed
    Him who sought to heal humanity
    Established Evil, drunk with power, swilled
    Lava-like liqueur. Then, Vanity
    Overcame Compassion with great ease.
    Regarding all with cynical disdain
    Destructive Self-Protection –– a disease
    Inflicting without mercy boundless pain ––
    Securing only Insecurity ––
    Appeared to stop the Upstart for all time.
    Lies. however. spawn no sense of surety.
    Immortal Truth stood witness to their crime.
    Victim humbled cruelly –– butchered –– He
    Emerged to free our lives –– internally.


    FreeThinke, The Sandpiper

    H-A-P-P-Y___E-A-S-T-E-R-!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Seeing Lynn Dawson perform is a lovely treat. Her singing is as beautiful as her person –– and vice versa –– a rare and wonderful combination.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A Very Happy Easter to the AOW's and all her readers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Z,
      I hope that your Easter Sunday was filled with blessings.

      Delete
  8. What a timely reminder for ME especially today. Lynn Dawson is a voice from heaven!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sometime's Stephen Cleobury's conducting, like that of his esteemed colleague John Eliot Gardiner, seems a little precious –– almost too elegant, attentuated and preoccupied with minute detail in every phrase so as to drain it of its life's blood ––, but I must say this vigorous, highly spirited rendition of the hackneyed Hallelujah Chorus was THRILLING.

    We don't often get to hear the old chestnut sung with such precision, clarity, splendid awareness of all the contrapuntal interplay, and marvelous control of dynamics at a tempo that makes you want to stand up and dance in the aisles.

    The complete absence of bombast and ponderousness too often present in older, more "traditional" renditions does Handel a great service.

    It's always a great joy to me to hear really GOOD singers and instrumentalist at work doing full justice to these great masterpieces.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FT,
      I deliberately chose this particular rending of "Hallelujah Chorus" for the reasons you mentioned:

      this vigorous, highly spirited rendition of the hackneyed Hallelujah Chorus was THRILLING.

      We don't often get to hear the old chestnut sung with such precision, clarity, splendid awareness of all the contrapuntal interplay, and marvelous control of dynamics at a tempo that makes you want to stand up and dance in the aisles.

      Delete
    2. BTW, the tempo and precision of this version is almost identical to the kind of performance that Normal Scribner used when he conducted "Hallelujah Chorus" with the National Symphony Orchestra. And with a huge choir, too!

      I was privileged to be an alto in the Choral Arts Society of Washington -- the only choir member under the age of 25 -- from December 1965-April 1968. The D.C. riots of 1968 was the reason that I had to resign from the choir. **sigh**

      FT,
      I know that you'll want to read this biography of Norman Scribner. I was one of those original 170 singers -- at the tender age of 13. What a wonderful music education I received under Norman's baton.

      Delete

We welcome civil dialogue at Always on Watch. Comments that include any of the following are subject to deletion:
1. Any use of profanity or abusive language
2. Off topic comments and spam
3. Use of personal invective