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Monday, November 29, 2010

Meanwhile, In New Jersey

A Muslim girl gets a non-Muslim boy suspended for saying "Taliban." Details from Creeping Sharia, citing this source (dated November 12, 2010), below the fold.

WAYNE — On one side, a Wayne Valley High school student claims that his use of the word “Taliban” was innocent, mentioned in a conversation about a video game, according to his mother.

But to a Muslim student who overheard it at school on Thursday, it was upsetting. And she had perceived that he had looked at her when he said it, Principal Robert Reis said.

Now the boy is facing a one-day suspension on Monday, because, Reis said, he continued to talk about the incident and it got back to the girl and upset her. Reis said she felt the boy was boasting that he’d gotten away with something.

“This has nothing to do with the fact that the boy used a word,” Reis said. “This has everything to do with the boy hurt a girl’s feelings.” And after the boy was told by administrators not to discuss what happened, Reis said, “He went back and hurt her feelings a second time.”

But the boy’s mother, Rosa Giordano, said the incident “is totally being blown out of proportion” and she plans to fight the disciplinary action.


[...]

Giordano claims her son was embarrassed by the incident. She said he told a friend “nothing happened” because he didn’t want to talk about it, not to brag that he got away with anything.
So, do you believe the principal's explanation?

And what about the Muslim girl's perception? Are going to discipline students because they "perceive" something, whether or not an incident, in this case a glance, actually occurred?

I've been trying to find more information about the context of the boy's use of the word "Taliban," but have so far not found more details. Commenters are encouraged to leave any such information.

10 comments:

  1. When my niece was in high school a guy was on her case for having an Arabic first name.

    She got suspended for belting him.

    ReplyDelete
  2. People are much too sensitive these days, especially Muslims. I wish I could go back to school and tease them all the more!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't have an Arabic first name, but I got teased mercilessly for the one I do have.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hurt feelings? They're suspending kids for that, now?!?

    Well, I suppose so, at least when it comes to defending Muslim feelings.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The overarching sensitivity of moslems never ceases to amaze.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ducky, he must have hated Arabs, typical American, huh? (sarcasm) High School dopes think any foreign name is silly.

    I can't even read the article because I refuse to believe your first sentence....BUt, let's face it, Obama can't bring himself to say it or jihad, either.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Duck, that's the first time you've made me laugh in a looooong time! Ha! Thanks.

    Great point, Z. And especially b/c our dear leader won't breathe "jihad" or "terrorism," I'm making it a point to become an ultrasensitive Christian American. I have my rights too! ...nyah, nyah, nyah...

    (and I AM serious.)

    ReplyDelete
  8. ...on second thought, make that an ultrasensitive, Christian, caucasian, Southern, heterosexual, married, over 40, female, curly brunette paying for blond highlights, maternal, underemployed, visually myopic, allergic to poison ivy but not peanut butter so don't put your peanut issues on me, American.

    I'll let you know when I come up w/ something else.

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  9. I wonder if the girl would have been suspended if she hurt the boys feelings.

    Sounds to me like it's yet another instance of the muslim super citizens doing what they feel like to infidels.

    ReplyDelete
  10. MK,
    I wonder if the girl would have been suspended if she hurt the boys feelings.

    Not likely, IMO.

    ReplyDelete

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